Remember COLD to Stay Warm

Remember COLD to Stay Warm

Remember the acronym COLD to stay warm! That’s advice from the Mayo Clinic on their page about hypothermia defined as “a medical emergency that occurs when your body loses heat faster than it can produce heat, causing a dangerously low body temperature.”

The article covers symptoms, causes and risk factors (including hypothyroidism which can be a primary ailment linked to Raynaud’s), plus complications such as frostbite which can lead to Raynaud’s.

What we liked most about this page was their use of the acronym COLD to stay warm in colder weather. The letters stand for Cover, Overexertion, Layers and Dry. Here’s how they explain it:

  • Cover – Those of us living with Raynaud’s know this well – cover hands with mittens instead of gloves, wear a hat and whatever else you can add to avoid losing body heat in areas not always well insulated like the face and neck.
  • Overexertion – The key here is not to sweat a lot (not a big problem for us Frosties in the cold!). Sweaty wet clothes in cold conditions can cause you to lose body heat more quickly .
  • Layers – Something Frosties do even in warmer weather! Several lightweight layers are better than fewer thick ones. Best fabrics include an outer layer that’s water-repellent, followed by inner layers that help wick away sweat like polypropylene, silk and wool (avoid cotton).
  • Dry – It’s a common theme: Wear clothes that help keep you dry, avoid too much exertion that could cause you to sweat, then if you should still get wet in the cold, remove the wet clothing as soon as you can. They make a case for hands and feet staying dry, which Frosties can surely agree with!

The page continues with tips for traveling safely in the car in winter weather, cold water survival safety tips, avoiding alcohol (don’t like this one, sorry!) and special advice for keeping children safe in the cold. Lots of good info, but all Frosties have to know is this: remember the acronym COLD to stay warm!

Here’s the link: Hypothermia