Swimming Tips

 

Swimming Tips

 

While the pool and ocean might seem like welcoming respites for some people during those hot and sunny summer months, for people with Raynaud’s Phenomenon, swimming can pose an interesting challenge.  That’s why we were asked to share some swimming tips for people with Raynaud’s.

In addition to emotional stress, a key trigger for Raynaud’s attacks is dramatic changes in temperatures in any direction, i.e. hot to cold or cold to hot. When it comes to swimming, both diving into cold water as well as moving out of a pool can bring on Raynaud’s symptoms like blood vessel constriction, hands and extremities turning white and blue and then red, as well as intense feelings of cold.

As someone with Raynaud’s, you may experience some symptoms when entering cold water, but as your body temperature adjusts and the vigorous activity of swimming warms you up, you are likely to be able to swim without an attack. For many, it’s getting out of the water that can result in a sudden onset of symptoms, including skin discoloration, throbbing, tingling, numbness, pain, and even swelling. For severe cases, symptoms can last for many hours.

Open water swims associated with triathlons may ban competitors from wearing gloves when swimming, which man