UCF College of Medicine Explores Botox® as a Treatment for Raynaud’s

Botox® as a Treatment for Raynaud'sWe’ve seen some promising research results on the use of Botox® as a treatment for Raynaud’s sufferers.  The studies to date have been small, so it’s difficult to draw conclusions, but good that Raynaud’s treatments options are getting some attention from the medical community.

The University of Central Florida (UCF) College of Medicine is currently undergoing one of these research studies, and we were notified of an article reporting the project in NCM Today, a student publication by the college titled “College of Medicine researching Botox as a treatment for Raynaud’s syndrome.”  The research is being conducted by Amelia Winter, a medical student, as part of the school’s Focused Inquiry & Research Experience program.

As Botox® is considered a cosmetic procedure, dermatologists are generally leading these research efforts.  Unfortunately, they aren’t the most knowledgeable experts on Raynaud’s, as evidenced by some of the quotes from Dr. David Weinstein, assistant professor of dermatology, involved in the UCF study:  He labels Raynaud’s as a rare disease and states that it is commonly associated with more serious autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and lupus.

Raynaud’s affects as many as 5 to 10% of the population, hardly rare, and less than 10% of sufferers are categorized as secondary to a more serious primary autoimmune ailment.  It’s because of these misconceptions that we published our post on 10 Myths About Raynaud’s Phenomenon last August.

Even the researchers don’t agree on the stats:  Winter is quoted as stating that “Raynaud’s affects up to 20 percent of the population.”  Well, it would be that high if you’re just counting the population of women in their childbearing years…

While initial tests are promising, Botox® is not a permanent cure, nor an option for every Raynaud’s patient, but it’s good that it’s being studied as a potential treatment option for Frosties seeking relief.

For more information, see our earlier post:  Questions Answered: Botox® Treatments for Raynaud’s