Cialis® in Drug Stores Soon?

Cialis BoxMore recent research has shown promise in using ED drugs such as sildenafil (Viagra®), vardenafil (Levitra®), and talkalafil (Cialis®) in treating Raynaud’s symptoms, particularly when traditional treatments such as vasodilators and topical nitroglycerine-based creams provide insufficient relief or aren’t well tolerated.

These drugs, while typically prescribed for ED in males, act as vasodilators which work to increase blood flow. In a number of studies, they’ve been found to reduce the frequency and duration of Raynaud’s attacks through increased blood flow to the extremities of Raynaud’s sufferers—including females.

While the potential relief these drugs may offer Raynaud’s sufferers is promising, insurance coverage for using these drugs off-label can take a lot of lobbying, particularly for us ladies.  Insurance companies also don’t understand the daily need for such meds, which can be required by Raynaud’s patients with severe attacks.

So it’s good news to hear that Lilly, the manufacturer of Cialis, has just struck a deal with another pharmaceutical company, Sanofi, to market the drug over-the-counter (OTC), therefore not requiring a prescription nor insurance paperwork to cover high-end prescription prices.

But it’s not yet time to celebrate, as the plan is to introduce the drug OTC in 2017 when Cialis’ patent expires, and there’s a lot of work to be done gaining regulatory approval before this can happen.  For more on the story and the issues involved in gaining regulatory support, see the article in the Wall Street Journal.  At least there’s hope that Frosties will one-day have easier access to drugs that are proving effective in making our lives warmer and more comfortable.

 

 

Even with their promising results in limited studies, these medications will not be a viable option for all sufferers. Raynaud’s patients report both positive and negative feedback, so work with your doctor to determine if they are right for you.

As for insurance coverage using these drugs off-label, it can take a lot of lobbying, but some Raynaud’s patients have been successful with their insurance providers. The key is to be persistent.