Two Frosties agreed to share the warming strategies they successfully used in coping with their Raynaud’s for our Fall 2021 Member Tips post.

Open Windows in the Office?  Add Layers of Warmth! 

Marie on Facebook found the only way she could survive Autumn in the UK when working in an office that kept all of the windows open:  “Use a hot water bottle for a wrist rest, add fingerless wrist warmers and a hot “cuppa.” (British for tea)

The rainbow-striped wrist warmers add some additional warming cheer. Thanks for sharing Marie!

Fall 2021 Member TipsAcupuncture with Old Fashioned Needles

Lyn in Australia told us she was grasping at straws when she first tried acupuncture treatment for her Raynaud’s, but had to do something because the pain in her fingers was so severe.  To her surprise, the relief was quite swift.  Her doctor (the acupuncturist was a fully qualified medical practitioner) combined Vitamin D injections with the treatments.  She’s convinced another factor that made the treatment more effective was the use of old-fashioned needles.  Here’s what she shared with us:

“My Raynauds was so severe (45 years ago now) I was terrified my fingers would develop gangrene (going completely bloodless for several hours each morning in winter, followed by turning black and incredibly painful for another hour). My General Practitioner said move to a warmer climate. Instead I went through an extensive course of acupuncture (performed with the old fashioned thick & thin needles…along with Vitamin D injections). I was extremely skeptical but the improvement was almost immediate. Even now if my fingers do start to go I always have some blood left under my nails & have only had a short ‘top up’ course 25 years ago. Occasionally they’ll still go out on me but never like pre-acupuncture days!!…Thanks for providing somewhere to pass on my positive experience.”

So glad this worked for you Lyn, but we do need to add a few caveats for those considering acupuncture treatments:

  • There is to date no accepted clinical evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture as a treatment for alleviating Raynaud’s symptoms.
  • The placebo effect can’t be ignored.
  • No one treatment will work for everyone. 
  • Make sure you review all treatment strategies with your doctor first.

Below are additional articles we’ve published on acupuncture for Raynaud’s sufferers:

My Raynaud’s Journey with Acupuncture

Treating Raynaud’s Subjects with Acupuncture

In addition to acupuncture, self-help, relaxation techniques, such as biofeedback and tai chi, work for some people to minimize the severity of Raynaud’s attacks.  These methods require a great deal of practice and commitment to achieve real results.  They won’t be effective for everyone, particularly for more severe secondary Raynaud’s sufferers, but some members have told us they’ve helped reduce their symptoms.

We appreciate fellow Frosties sharing their Fall 2021 Member Tips with us.  What are your ideas?  What products work for you?  Write to info@raynauds.org, post them on our Facebook page or share them with us on Instagram or Twitter.

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