Hot Products for Spring 2016

We found some new products on the market that may be of interest to Raynaud’s sufferers:

Eight Smart Mattress CoverEight Mattress Cover – Eight is a smart mattress cover that can track your sleep patterns, monitor your vital signs and – best of all for us Frosties – offers personalized climate controls with 10 different temperature levels.  Choose between three ways to adjust the temperature:  Smart (using sensors and an advanced algorithm), Scheduled (via your smartphone) or Manual (as needed).  It can also be connected to a Nest thermostat system to adjust room temperatures to optimize your sleeping comfort.  The technology analyzes over 15 factors from your sleep patterns and your bedroom environment to determine the conditions that help you rest your best, and they claim their tracking accuracy is better than that achieved by smart wearables.   The top layer of the mattress cover zips off for easy washing and repels liquids, dust and stains.  The company just completed a round of crowdfunding and is accepting pre-orders for $99 at www.eightsleep.com.  If you try it, let us know what you think!

Heatr SportwearHEATR® Sportwear – WSI Sports manufactures a specially-engineered fabric used in making cold weather apparel that claims to warm up when making contact with the skin.  The “special sauce” is mapped to key areas of the body so that the fabric is focused on those areas that most need the heat.  The sportwear comes in three levels of warmth:  Warm (0 to 75°), Warmer (-10 to 60°) and Warmest (-20 to 50°).  The base layers have pretty high price tags ($70 to $140), plus some accessories (hats, socks, scarves and glove liners) for $25 to $50.  If they live up to their claims, they’d be well worth the cost!  There’s lots of other sports-oriented merchandise on the site, so look for the Cold Weather Gear on their menu tabs.

Salomon Quest Access Custom Heat BootsSalomon Quest Access Custom Heat Ski Boots – We know it’s off-season, but couldn’t wait to share these new heated ski boots.  Frosties have historically had a few choices for keeping toes warm:  Disposable heat packs, which help, but for some of us, aren’t enough for braving the cold slopes.  Years ago I discovered a comfortable boot with a built-in heater – they worked well, but the batteries didn’t last that long.  As a result,  I would keep the heat setting low to conserve battery life, and carried a spare battery for an emergency replacement later in the day.  Over the years, boot manufacturers stopped making heated boots – instead stores would sell aftermarket heated insoles and install them inside any preferred boot.  The assumption was that skiers would prioritize a comfortable boot of their choice over the convenience of built-in heaters and controls (they obviously didn’t sell boots to a lot of Frosties!).  So we were happy to see Salomon offering heated boots with new technology extending battery life up to 18 hours, pending the temperature and settings used.  The key is embedding two slim batteries inside the liner to help insulate the batteries.  Also limiting the heating elements to just above the toes uses less energy than elements extending the full length of the sole, but delivering more overall heat to the foot.  The photos also show a fuzzy material at the top of the liner.  Not sure how far the material goes down into the boot, but it appears infinitely more comfy than the traditional rubbery fabric or ventilated cloth used on many boots.   The cost may seem steep at $600, but the upcharge for the heated version of these boots is only $150.  Aftermarket heaters generally run about $250 or more.  Here’s the link for the Women’s version of the boot on Salomon’s site.

If you try any of the above products, we’d love your feedback, and please share your new product finds with us. Write to info@raynauds.org, post them in our Discussion Forum or on our Facebook Fan page.